Fashion-Forward: What To and What Not To Wear To Weddings

Nowadays, couples are more progressive than they used to be – but weddings still have some fashion rules, although they’ve changed quite a lot.

Modern brides sometimes go for elegant pants instead of traditional gowns, occasional grooms are skipping the typical black tux for a pastel suit, and even bridesmaids are choosing something they can wear again. In addition, guests also have just as much freedom with their styles.

However, there are some things to remember while getting dressed up to still be respectful of the wedding ceremony and the people getting married. Some of the rules are straightforward and very easy to follow—like what colors are better to avoid, etc. Don’t worry, though!

Below, there is a list of some useful tips that will help wedding guests catch up with the dress code of the wedding they are about to attend.

1. Don’t wear white.

Fashion-Forward: What To and What Not To Wear To a Wedding

Also off-white, and very pale blue are not recommendable. White is for the bride. For those who still want to wear something close to white, then they need to try a neutral!

2. Leave the sweats at home.

Even if the wedding is a more casual event, it definitely won’t be that casual. For those who are concerned about their comfort level for the day, they can try an outfit in a soft, natural fabric like cotton.

3. Denim is a no, no.

Jeans are too casual for a momentous occasion like this. A blue jumpsuit in a different material, for example, is a much better option than regular jeans.

4. Say bye to shorts, guys.

Guys who want to feel comfortable should go with lightweight pants, which can help combat any problem with the heat.

5. Cover your shoulders when applicable.

Is the wedding ceremony taking place in a church or an institution with a more modest dress code? Guests should be respectful of that and bring a shawl or sweater to cover the top of the arms.

6. Rips and holes, even intentional ones, do not belong.

For those who like the idea of showing a little flesh, it is good to consider a stylish cutout.

7. Rethink the sparkles.

Fashion-Forward: What To and What Not To Wear To a Wedding

In this case, instead of metallics, people can go with tons of texture. Ruffles, for example, look great!

8. Be aware of your neckline.

Fashion-Forward: What To and What Not To Wear To a Wedding

Weddings are family-friendly, and it is good to bear this in mind when choosing a dress with a deep V neckline.

9. Leave the flip-flops at home.

Comfort is very important, especially for those who plan to do a number or two on the dance floor. But rubbery slides are out of the question at a wedding.

10. Forget about that T-shirt.

Graphic and plain shirts are off-limits. They are just too casual. Instead, wedding guests can wear fancy blouses with tailored pants for a relaxed yet wedding-appropriate outfit.

Scary Bridges Found All Around The World

Hussaini Hanging Bridge – Pakistan

We cross bridges all the time without giving a moment’s thought to their level of safety. Although all people are said to be created equal, bridges certainly are not. Glancing at some of these photos, it becomes crystal clear that crossing these bridges is extremely hazardous. Environmental facts also influence the safety of these bridges. Poor weather and atmospheric conditions can greatly compromise the safety of an otherwise sturdy bridge. And let’s be honest: not even the highest safety standards can calm vertigo when looking 1,000 or more feet at the bottom. Come, join us to see the most dangerous bridges in the world. But whatever you do, don’t look down!

Hussaini Hanging Bridge – Pakistan

Along the banks of Borit Lake in Northern Pakistan lies the village of Hussaini, which lends its name to the Hussaini Hanging Bridge. This makeshift footpath is constructed from sticks and wooden planks haphazardly connected, with unpredictable gaps where your foot should go.

Hussaini Hanging Bridge – Pakistan

Since it was first constructed, the bridge has been repeatedly destroyed and rebuilt. At no point does it seem to have been professionally constructed. If you want to make it to the other side, don’t look down!

Mekong River Crossing – China

Beginning in the Tibetan Plateau, the Mekong River meanders through China, Burma, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. While some parts of the river are relatively gentle, rapids rage in some sections of the river, which is over 2,700 miles long.

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Mekong River Crossing – China

The photo you see below was apparently taken following some serious rains. The man crossing the river above the tumultuous waters appears to know what he’s doing — or so we hope! Even a strong swimmer would risk drowning in those conditions.

Royal Gorge Bridge – Colorado

In these breathtaking photographs from then and now, you can see Colorado’s famous Royal Gorge Bridge. One of the most spectacular suspension bridges in the world, it spans 1,260 feet over a rocky canyon. For over 50 years since it was first built in 1929, it had no stabilizing wind cables.

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Royal Gorge Bridge – Colorado

Today, this feature is considered crucial for a bridge’s structural integrity, so the Royal Gorge was renovated to include wind cables in 1982. Although it is much safer than before, this is another bridge that we simply do not recommend looking down from!

Millau Viaduct – France

France is home to the tallest bridge in the world: the Millau Viaduct. Standing at some 1,125 above its base, this cable-stayed bride traverses southern France’s Gorge Valley. Over 105 feet wide and 8,000 feet long, construction on the Millau Viaduct began in 2001 and was completed in just three years.

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Millau Viaduct – France

This bridge is counted among modern engineering’s greatest feats to this day. The International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering even awarded it the 2006 Outstanding Structure Award.

Iya Kazurabashi Bridge – Japan

Tokushima, Japan, is home to one of the most fascinating bridges on this list. Above the Iya-gawa River lies the Iya Valley’s magnificent vine bridges, dating back to the 12th century.

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Iya Kazurabashi Bridge – Japan

One of the most terrifying of these unique footbridges is the Iya Kazurabashi Bridge, a rickety structure constructed of wooden planks held together for extra strength by woven mountain vines. If you think you truly live life on the edge, try crossing the bridge without holding on to the railing. Watch your step on this one!

Mystery Bridge – Indonesia

Surfers and skateboarders trying to develop or improve their balance often use something called an “Indo Board.” The idea is to balance yourself on a board that lies on a foam cylinder without allowing the ends to touch the floor.

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Mystery Bridge – Indonesia

But even the best “indo-boarder” would have trouble successfully crossing over this Indonesian bridge, which seems ready to fall into the flowing water below. Although it is likely unsafe for use, that doesn’t seem to faze these schoolchildren!

Bridge Of Immortals – China

The Bridge of Immortals, in the mountains of eastern China, is a mission in itself just to get to. Located in the scenic Huangshan, meaning “Yellow Mountain,” mountain range, the path to the bridge is made of wooden planks held together by old, rusty nails.

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Bridge Of Immortals – China

It winds around the mountain, following the cliffside. This is one of the most iconic historical sites and tourist destination in the region. Because of its importance to Chinese art and literature, it is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge – Ireland

Northern Ireland is home to the Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge, quite possibly the scariest bridge on this list. Each year, adrenaline addicts from around the world travel to the UK to traverse the 65-foot bridge that hangs 100 feet over a rocky shore and cliffside.

Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge – Ireland

Originally, a local fisherman designed the bridge so he could get to Carrick Island, but for some reason decided to put up only one rope handrail. Fortunately, the bridge now offers a handrail on either side.

Sidu River Bridge – China

In China’s Badong County lies the Sidu River Valley, above which you will find a suspension bridge stretching over 4,000 feet long. A fall from this bridge to the bottom would take you a while — it is 1,600 feet high!

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Sidu River Bridge – China

In 2009, when the bridge was completed, it was the highest bridge in the world. While other bridges featured on this list were built haphazardly and unprofessionally, this one was constructed using modern science and technologies. Still, it looks scary to cross!

Trift Bridge – Switzerland

The Trift suspension bridge, situated near the town of Gadmen in the Swiss Alps, spans 558 feet over the Swiss glaciers some 328 feet below. Originally built in 2004, those brave enough to cross the bridge on foot were quick to notice a major problem: the bridge would rock back and forth violently in the wind!

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Trift Bridge – Switzerland

Stabilizing cables were added in 2009 to minimize the danger caused by the swinging, but that doesn’t ease our minds enough to cross like these brave souls in the photo are!

Deception Pass Bridge – Washington

Whidbey Island and Fidalgo Island in Washington state are connected by Deception Pass Bridge, which is actually two separate two-lane bridges. Deception Pass Bridge is almost 1,500 feet long and some 180 feet above Oak Harbor.

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Deception Pass Bridge – Washington

In 1983, the bridge’s spans were repainted, which actually cost more money than it cost to build them in 1935. This bridge was honored as a historical monument and placed in the National Register of Historic Places as a magnificent example of mankind’s engineering expertise.

Hanging Bridge Of Ghasa – Nepal

Nepal’s Hanging Bridge of Ghasa is used by both humans and animals, believe it or not. Donkeys and cattle regularly cross the frightening footbridge, high above the river valley below.

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Hanging Bridge Of Ghasa – Nepal

The Bridge of Ghasa is vulnerable to wind and rain, dangerously swaying back and forth in these conditions. Despite the danger, this bridge has been in continuous use for decades. High side rails protect those courageous enough to cross. Would you be brave enough to try?

The Langkawi Sky Bridge – Malaysia

On first glance, the Langkawi Sky Bridge looks more like a rollercoaster, curving around the mountains of Kedah in Malaysia. It is built to hold a maximum capacity of 200 pedestrians at one time.

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The Langkawi Sky Bridge – Malaysia

The entire bridge relies on only one angled pylon for support, which is quite terrifying! This unique design was only completed in 2005, but authorities shut the bridge down in 2012 for maintenance and upgrades. After years of delays, the bridge was once again deemed suitable for regular use and reopened in 2015.

Mount Titlis Bridge – Switzerland

Once again the list takes us to the Swiss Alps, but this time at some 10,000 feet above sea level. The Titlis Cliff Walk is a pedestrian bridge, considered to be the highest elevation in Europe, suitable for only the most courageous mountaineers.

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Mount Titlis Bridge – Switzerland

At only three feet wide, the 320-foot long bridge gives you the feeling you’re on a tightrope. The Titlis Cliff Walk is unfazed by wind, reportedly able to withstand winds of up to 120 miles an hour. Thanks, but no thanks! We wouldn’t want to push our luck here anytime soon.

Vitim River Bridge – Siberia

The fact that the Vitim River Bridge is still standing is in itself a miracle. Deep in the Siberian tundra, the old train bridge repurposed for vehicles and pedestrians connects the banks of the Vitim River.

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Vitim River Bridge – Siberia

Not for the fainthearted, rotting wooden planks sit atop rusting metal, and the bridge frequently freezes in the cold weather. For those unfazed by this dangerous bridge, note the lack of railings in the pictures. To make matters worse, the bridge moves to and fro with the ebb and flow of the tide.

Quepos Bridge – Costa Rica

Nicknamed “The Bridge of Death” or the “Oh My God” bridge, the Quepos Bridge in Costa Rica clearly deserves a place on this list. Situated near the central Pacific coast, the bridge was constructed in 1930 to connect between Jaco and Quepos.

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Quepos Bridge – Costa Rica

The bridge is just big enough to allow for one-way traffic by car, but that doesn’t stop truck drivers from trying to cross the narrow path simply because they have no other choice.

Eshima Ohashi Bridge – Japan

You know the sensation of anxiety and suspense you get as a rollercoaster slowly approaches the drop-off point? How about the feeling immediately afterward in your stomach as you start to fall over the edge?

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Eshima Ohashi Bridge – Japan

That’s what you would feel driving on the two-lane Eshima Ohashi Bridge in western Japan. This bridge is about a mile long, rising at a 6.1 percent gradient over Lake Najaumi. This extreme bridge was designed to allow ships to pass underneath.

Sunshine Skyway Bridge – Florida

Commonly known as “the Skyway,” the Sunshine Skyway Bridge in Florida is a massive bridge between St. Petersburg and Terra Ceia that extends above Tampa Bay for over four miles. It took five years to build, but that was well worth the wait, as this engineering marvel is considered Florida’s “flag bridge.”

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Sunshine Skyway Bridge – Florida

The Skyway reaches a whopping 430 feet high, so if you’re afraid of heights, we would strongly recommend taking a boat instead to cross Tampa Bay.

U Bein Bridge – Burma

Located in Burma, the U Bien Bridge spans three-quarters of a mile over Taungthaman Lake. It was built in 1850 with teak, a type of hardwood found in the tropics. There is no support or anything to hold on to on the sides, but that isn’t the only thing making this bridge dangerous.

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U Bein Bridge – Burma

In recent years, it has become a hub of criminal activity, prompting the police to establish a force to guard the bridge for tourists.

Storseisundet Bridge – Norway

The island of Averøya in Norway is connected to the Romsdal Peninsula on the mainland by the Storeisundet Bridge, which uniquely makes use of cantilevers. These are massive structures used by architects that stretch out horizontally but are supported only on one side.

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Storseisundet Bridge – Norway

This bridge spans 850 feet and is 75 feet above the sea at its highest point. Due to unpredictable weather, the Storseisundet Bridge took six years to build. Construction was set back by no less than 12 hurricanes!

Root Bridges – India

What’s cool about the bridges in this photo is that they were constructed naturally. The Ficus elastica is a tree that thrives in the southern Khasi and Jaintia hills in India. This species features secondary roots that shoot out from the trunk above the ground.

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Root Bridges – India

Local tribes such as the War-Khasis and the War-Jaintias over time discovered that manipulating the trees’ natural growth can produce these spectacular bridges that allowed them to cross over rivers and through the forest.

Seven Mile Bridge – Florida

As the name suggests, Seven Mile Bridge in Florida indeed spans for almost seven miles in the Florida Keys. It stretches from Knight’s Key in Marathon, Florida, to the lower keys, at the time of its construction one of the longest bridges in the world.

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Seven Mile Bridge – Florida

The fair weather in the photograph doesn’t suggest danger, but take into account Florida’s infamous hurricane weather. The region is hit by these tropical storms frequently and reliably enough for it to be considered one of America’s most dangerous bridges.

Montenegro Rainforest Bridge – Costa Rica

Those who loved climbing trees as children can reconnect with their inner child by visiting Costa Rica’s Sky Walk. This is a network of six footbridges you can walk through on your next vacation that spans for a total of 984 feet through the treetops of the Monteverde rainforest.

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Montenegro Rainforest Bridge – Costa Rica

Trekkers get a rare glimpse into what the upper levels of the rainforest have to offer. Don’t forget your bug spray, and keep an eye out from snakes and jaguars!

Taman Negara Canopy Walkway – Malaysia

Malaysia’s Taman Negara canopy walkway is considered the longest suspension footbridge of its kind. Tourists from all over the world come here to view one of the world’s oldest deciduous forests, which is estimated to be over 130 million years old!

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Taman Negara Canopy Walkway – Malaysia

The bridge itself is quite a sight to see, extending for over 1,700 feet. It also dangles over 130 feet above the forest floor, making this footbridge certainly not for the faint of heart. Don’t look down!

Keshwa Chaca Bridge – Peru

As far as building materials go, grass doesn’t sound the most sturdy, but the Keshwa Chaca Bridge has stood the test of time since the Incas built it over 500 years ago. This fascinating South American civilization coordinated efforts between the sexes, with Incan women braiding small, thin ropes that the men then braided into large support cables.

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Keshwa Chaca Bridge – Peru

This bridge spans 118 feet, 60 feet over a raging canyon river below. This is one of the last remaining such rope bridges from the age of Incan engineering.

The Pontchartrain Causeway – Louisiana

Although it doesn’t look that way in the photograph, the Pontchartrain Causeway in southern Louisiana does eventually return motorists to dry land. If you’re ever about to drive on it, make sure you fill up your gas tank, because the bridge is almost 24 miles long.

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The Pontchartrain Causeway – Louisiana

When you’re in the middle, you can’t see land in either direction. Keep that in mind if you have a fear of open water — this bridge may not be for you!

Aiguille Du Midi Bridge – France

The bridge on Aiguille du Midi, meaning “Needle of Midday,” can indeed be said to be located between a rock and a hard place. Although it spans several yards, this bridge was constructed at 12,605 feet above sea level.

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Aiguille Du Midi Bridge – France

That’s enough to get anyone’s blood pumping, no matter how brave! To get there, visitors must ascend 9,200 feet vertically on a 20-minute cable car to reach the scenic, man-made structure. Once there, the panorama is surely unforgettable.

Kakum Canopy Walkway – Ghana

An extensive network of bridges hangs over Kakum National Park in Ghana’s Central Region, located in the country’s southern coast. This forest boasts a myriad of flora and fauna that visitors can view from above in the canopy.

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Kakum Canopy Walkway – Ghana

These footbridges are as high as 160 feet above the forest floor. Not all bridges on this list feature safety netting like these bridges do, but that shouldn’t be taken to mean these bridges aren’t absolutely terrifying to cross!

Ai Petri Bridge – Ukraine

Mountaineers and thrill-seekers alike flock high up to the mountains of Ukraine to cross the Ai Petri Bridge, a frightening footbridge that hangs high above a canyon some 4,200 feet deep. This bridge connects two peaks in the Crimean Mountains.

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Ai Petri Bridge – Ukraine

Although the height alone is enough to paralyze you with vertigo, it’s the strong high winds and frequent fog that make this bridge so dangerous. Expect the bridge to sway dangerously, even on a particularly calm day. If the fog subsides, visitors can see Yalta and the Black Sea below.

Baliem River Bridge – Western New Guinea

The Baliem Valley in Western New Guinea, Indonesia, is home to this terrifying bridge. Even though the whole point of crossing a bridge is avoiding what’s below, we wouldn’t suggest attempting to cross this bridge without a swimsuit and life jacket.

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Baliem River Bridge – Western New Guinea

The rough rapids of the Baliem River are likely to sweep you away. The locals who built this bridge appear to have used the same outline as what professional engineers use, but we’re not so sure it’s as safe.